Department of Culture and Learning

Speakers

BENGT PERSSON

professor of special education The University of Borås, Sweden

SPECIAL EDUCATION IN SWEDISH PRIMARY SCHOOL - IDEALITY AND REALITY


Bengt Persson explains the progress of Swedish special education in connection with the arrival of the elementary school in the 1960s, the development in the following decades and describes the present. The findings are based on the results of some research projects led by Bengt Persson from the mid-1990s to the present. Specialist pedagogy's diverse function in the Swedish school is addressed, as are the efforts of recent years to reduce the proportion of pupils receiving special pedagogical support.

 

Peder Haug

professor of pedagogy, Volda University College, Norway

WHAT IS TYPICAL FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION IN NORWAY


Peder Haug emphasizes that the teaching skills of special education teachers are not optimal. Teachers' expectations and attitudes towards students receiving special education can be a challenge. Special education can be exclusionary and students' experience of the different conditions at school is relatively negative. Special education has a great potential for learning, but this potential is not exploited. The connection between special education and ordinary education can be weak. The quality of the learning outcomes for the pupils receiving special education is very variable, a theme for themselves. Based on this, it is ultimately reflected on what measures can improve the situation for these students.

 

Niels Egelund

professor of special education DPU, University of Aarhus, Denmark

THE CHANGE IN THE SPECIAL EDUCATION CONCEPT IN DENMARK WHAT DOES IT MEAN IN PRACTICE?


Niels Egelund focuses on efforts to increase inclusion in Denmark. Here, the concept of special education was changed in 2012 to cover only support needs of more than 9 hours. Support for students with less needs than 9 hours is referred to as “Supplemental Instruction and Other Academic Support,” and it does not require a report from the Pedagogical Psychological Counseling page. The school principal is solely responsible for the assignment, and parents have no redress. Niels Egelund will present a quantitative survey covering 70,000 Danish pupils in 13 municipalities and a qualitative survey of 19 schools in 12 municipalities.

 

David Mitchell

adjunct professor University of Canterbury, New Zealand

WHICH STRATEGIES ARE MOST USEFUL WHEN CRISES ARE TO BE RESOLVED IN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION


All over the world, many children are being let down by the education system - a situation David Mitchell describes as a crisis. In most countries, this is children from homes with low socioeconomic status and children from certain ethnic minorities. In some countries, educational discrimination is linked to gender, religion or disability. To tackle this crisis, we need to develop comprehensive strategies. The responsibility for implementing such strategies lies with government, bureaucracy, school leaders and teachers in the classrooms. During this presentation, David Mitchell will outline a range of strategies, based on his international research reviews.

 

Thomas Nordahl

professor of pedagogy Høgskolen i Innlandet Norge and adjunct professor at Aalborg University

NOW WE HAVE TRIED LONG ENOUGH WITH SPECIAL TEACHING.


Thomas Nordahl has chaired an expert committee, which has assessed offers for children and young people who need organized initiatives in kindergarten and school. The mandate has been to contribute to a high-quality pedagogical and special educational offer, which contributes to children and young people experiencing increased inclusion in kindergarten and school. In this presentation, the expert committee's assessments and proposals will be presented. Most of the committee's assessments and proposals will have a clear relevance in the Danish context.

Contact

Conference secretary Jeanette Arboe
Email: jma@hum.aau.dk
Phone: 9940 3062

Organizer Ole Hansen
E-mail: oh@hum.aau.dk
Phone: 9940 2346