Department of Culture and Learning

DEMOS ONLINE LECTURES

Time

12.02.2021 kl. 12.30 - 31.05.2021 kl. 14.15

Description

PLATFORM 

The talks will take place on Zoom, links for the Zoom meetings will be announced on the DEMOS Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/DEMOS.AAU

PASSCODE

To get the zoom passcode we have set up zoom registration- link for registration can be found on SoMe events. For questions contact: evinte18@student.aau.dk

RECORDING

Please note that the DEMOS online lectures will be recorded and uploaded to the DEMOS YouTube channel.

Programme

Click here

LECTURES


POPULISM: FROM THE LEFT TO THE RIGHT; FROM THE SOUTH TO THE EAST DATE: FEBRURARY 12TH • TIME: 12:30–14:15

In this conversation, Óscar García Agustín (Aalborg University) and Attila Antal (Eötvös Loránd University) will talk about the different meanings of populism and its manifestations both ideologically (left or right) and geographically (South, East, North). The discussion will take as its starting point the books Left-Wing Populism and The Rise of Hungarian Populism, both from 2020.

COERCIVE GEOGRAPHIES: HISTORICIZING MOBILITY, LABOUR, AND CONFINEMENT DATE: FEBRURARY 26TH • TIME: 12:30–14:15

In this talk Martin Bak Jørgensen will present an outline of the book Coercive Geographies: Historicizing Mobility, Labor and Confinement published on Brill in 2021. Responding to the deteriorating situation of migrants today and the complex assemblages of the geographies they navigate, this volume examines historical and contemporary forms of coercion and constraint exercised by a wide range of actors in diverse settings. It links the question of spatial confines to that of labor.

THE COMMODIFICATION OF LIVING KNOWLEDGE: THE CASE OF NORDIC CHILDCARE KNOW-HOW IN CHINA DATE: MARCH 12TH • TIME: 12:30–14:15

In this presentation, Magnus Andersen investigates how the Nordic welfare state is turned into a commodity in contemporary global capitalism. This is explored through the phenomenon of ‘welfare export’ of Nordic childcare know-how from Denmark to China. Magnus Andersen shows how Nordic childcare know-how is the outcome of a prevalent reconfiguration of the welfare-state construction, as capital has to ‘capture’ the productive aspects of abstract and common resources such as cultural products, traditional knowledges, or social institutions in its process of valorisation. Tracing each step of Nordic childcare know-how, the presentation illustrates how such phenomenon cannot be perceived as an isolated phenomenon but as something that involves several societal transformations, both historical and contemporary in different local contexts. With concepts such as the pedagogical factory, the subjective figure of the pedagogised and the total subsumption of the pedagogical, Magnus Andersen illustrates the political economy of welfare export which is tied to current tendency of cognitive capitalism

THE HISTORICAL PHENOMENOLOGY OF HUMAN RIGHTS DATE: MARCH 26TH •TIME: 12:30-14:15

By Ben Dorfman

Part of a three-part look at the foundations, consequences, and aesthetics of rights ideas, this talk will discuss a historical phenomenology of human rights – in plain language, why are rights a “cultural dominant,” to use Fredric Jameson’s terms, and, in an age of rights ideology, what’s the purpose of the historicization of the idea? In this talk, I will attempt to outline the bases of rights as today’s political absolute, as well as ask what that status means for rights advocacy – which is to engage it to its maximal extent

THE DARK SIDE OF TRUST: HOW AND WHEN TRUST ORGANIZES INEQUALITY AND EXCLUSION DATE: APRIL 16TH • TIME: 12:30-14:15

By Heidrun Knorr and Anne L. Zakaria

In a Scandinavian context and tradition, organizations are primarily seen as ‘good’ organizations; they are viewed as rather benevolent, trusting, transparent, inclusive and encouraging in terms of participation and equal opportunities of employees (Holck, 2013; Risberg & Søderberg, 2008). Hence, the notions of trust, inclusiveness and equal opportunities are assumed to positively reinforce each other. In this context, trust often seems to be the bedrock for all organizational practices; it represents an essential part of many organizations’ value-sets and seems to promise equal access to a company’s common good, such as access to decision making, organizational benefits, career advancement and being trusted to organize and complete one’s tasks freely (Argandoña, 1998). Practices of exclusion and discrimination based on gender or ethnicity are usually denied or believed not to exist (Pedersen, 2020). However, discrimination also forms part of the Scandinavian working context as lately exemplified by the revelation of power abuse in a variety of Danish workplaces. For instance, Dahl and Søgård (2015) found that discrimination was more outspoken in smaller organizations than larger ones, and that discrimination in private organizations was higher than in public ones (Stenum, 2017; Mellemfolkeligt Samvirke, 2018). Discrimination in Denmark is thus a reality, despite the Danish self-perception of being inclusive, transparent and trusting (Holck, 2013; Risberg & Søderberg, 2008; Nilsson & Wrench, 2009).

BUILDING TRANSVERSAL SOLIDARITIES IN EUROPEAN CITIES: OPEN HARBOURS, SAFE COMMUNITIES, HOME DATE: MAY 28TH • TIME: 13:00-15:00

By Ilker Ataç (University of Vienna)

Over the past years, we have seen a rise in political mobilisations in EUrope and elsewhere, by and in solidarity with migrant newcomers. This talk focuses on specific examples of what we conceptualise as transversal solidarities by and with migrants, and rooted in the city, the focus of this special issue. The examples I explore in this talk include: Trampoline House, a civil society organisation which provides a home to migrant newcomers in Copenhagen; Queer Base, an activist organisation in Vienna providing support for LGBTIQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer) migrants; and finally, the Palermo Charter Process, a coalition of diverse groups seeking to create open harbours and ‘corridors of solidarity’, from the Mediterranean to cities throughout EUrope. While these examples are situated in and across different urban spaces, they share a common grounding in building solidarity through spaces of encounters related to ideas of home, community, and harbour. By exploring these distinct solidarity initiatives in tandem, we examine, on the one hand, how the production of spaces of encounters is linked to building transversal solidarities and, on the other, how transversal solidarities also connect different spaces of solidarity across different political scales.

REFUGEE SOLIDARITY SQUATS AS POLITICAL INFRASTRUCTURES OF CARE: A FEMINIST ACTIVIST RESEARCH IN ORFANOTROFIO, GREECE DATE: MAY 21ST • 12:30-14:15

By Matina Kapsali (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki)

In this presentation, I discuss refugee solidarity squats as political infrastructures of care. Drawing on a feminist activist research in Orfanotrofio housing squat conducted between 2015-2017, I narrate the process of collective home making in the squat by investigating how activists and refugees negotiated their different subject positions and challenged the differential lines of power that defined them, such as gender, political background, race and so on. Drawing on critical geographical scholarship and feminist research on care and social reproduction, I argue that refugee squats are not only sites of struggle against anti-migration policies but also stages for the collectivisation of care through the enactment of equality. Through my analysis, I foreground equality and care as co-constitutive practices; equality becomes embodied through the collectivisation of care while care becomes politicised through the enactment and presupposition of equality. In the presentation, I also reflect on the methodological complexities of doing research in solidarity.